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Could AR and VR learning experiences change the way we work?

AR tools such as Manifest are already experimenting with alternative learning experiences for workplace trainees

First-day nerves come with the territory of a new job and so does the initial learning curve of learning the ropes. Regardless of the role you’re working in there’s always new information you need to take in if you’re lucky, there’ll be someone on hand to help you through the process. But imagine if the hand-holding stage wasn’t performed in the flesh, and instead augmented reality could be used to ease you in and provide the training you need.

That very scenario is becoming a reality with Taqtile‘s AR tools, Manifest and Manifest Maker. These tools allow users to leverage the power of augmented reality to improve workflow and ensure jobs are done correctly and consistently.

So, what do they do?

Manifest can be used to train new members of staff and get them up to speed without taking up the precious time from another skilled worker. Instead, new employees get to work, grab a headset and are all set for training. The AR tutorials on board are all previously recorded videos from an experienced individual, this then allows the trainee to follow in their footsteps to get the job done. The AR setup can showcase a series of steps to complete and offer prompts and guidance on how to get the job done, such as highlighting what a button does and where the user can find it.

Switching to a more digital format for training allows the trainee to see every step in detail and also eliminates the issue of not knowing what training someone has actually received. Through the app users can track their progress and make notes where needed, it also ensures that the exact same level of training quality is provided each and every time for all employees. Of course, there’s always the issue of being confused or lost in the AR instructions that are now hovering around everything you look at. This is where remote assistance can be used, enabling users to make an audio call or a “see-what-I-see” video where human experts can step in to provide extra support.

Manifest Maker works in a similar fashion but rather than immersing yourself with an AR headset, you can simply use an iPad. A training procedure can be documented in video form and then transcribed into a simple step-by-step instruction process. Still images can be grabbed from the videos that have marker prompts such as arrows on points of interest and the videos themselves are all fully subtitled so users won’t miss a beat. Manifest Makers iPad capabilities make it accessible for everyone and  can be used to train staff or be used to refresh the memory of old skills.

Changing the way we work

Technology in all of its forms has altered the way we live and work and advancements in AR and VR technology are now presenting further ways of adapting our workplaces, particularly in the training field. Recently a London University used VR to train future doctors in high-pressure situations such as in the event of a cardiac arrest. In training, these types of experiences are something that would usually be difficult for a new doctor to gain first-hand knowledge and experience on, but with VR those circumstances can be replicated to provide a safe training environment.

Emirates NBD, a leading banking group in Dubai introduced a virtual reality academy that provides a more engaging learning experience for its employees, these training sessions consist of short five-minute training modules which aim to enhance customer service. This method is intended to help keep the trainee more engaged with the content and find the experience more immersive than that of traditional training methods.

These types of alternate methods for how to learn and work are an attempt at making learning processes more streamlined and offer an environment that essentially has no real-world repercussions. If a junior doctor has difficulty with a procedure and buckles under the pressure in VR, there’s no harm done.

AR training also provides workers with an easy way to refresh their memory. Sometimes people simply don’t like to ask for help, or feel like they’re bothering a co-worker if they ask “Can you show me that one more time”. In those instances the worker could grab a headset and use the training program to refresh their memory instead.

While AR and VR technology is still something many are getting to grips with, it seems likely that these immersive learning experiences could find themselves in our workplaces more often in the future.

Written By

Paige Cook is a writer with a multi-media background. She has experience covering video games and technology and also has freelance experience in video editing, graphic design, and photography. Paige is a massive fan of the movie industry and loves a good TV show, if she is not watching something interesting then she's probably playing video games or buried in a good book. Her latest addiction is virtual photography and currently spends far too much time taking pretty pictures in games rather than actually finishing them.

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